Tag Archive | history

rick barry  If you haven’t met Rick Barry, then you definitely need to. He’s authored three novels: Gunner’s Run, Kiriath’s Quest, and most recently The Methuselah Project. In addition, he has hundreds of published articles and short stories to his credit.

But that’s not all, Rick speaks Russian, and served in the home offices of two ministries aimed at the former USSR. preaching

By God’s grace, I have visited Eastern Europe over 50 times and worked in Christian camps for children and teens.

His experiences have included skydiving, mountain climbing, rappelling, camping in Russia, kayaking, wilderness hiking, white-water rafting, visiting World War II battlegrounds, even prowling deserted apartments in the evacuated Chernobyl district of Ukraine. He believes that all experiences in life provide fuel for a writer’s imagination. And, he has also served multi-terms as president of American Christian Fiction Writers (ACFW) – Indiana Chapter.

In your newest book, The Methuselah Project, was your book research intensive? Did you find some fun facts?

rick barry book

Definitely. In my experience, writing a novel set at any point in past history requires research, especially if the time period is World War II, which continues to interest the public widely. If your details are inaccurate, there are amateur historians who will shoot you down. As bad as that feels for the author, I believe it hurts worse for the reader, who can no longer enjoy the story knowing that the author hasn’t done the homework and doesn’t really know what he or she is talking about. Fun facts that I learned might bore others, but they include flight characteristics of a P-47 fighter plane and historical details concerning Plainfield, Indiana, the childhood home of my hero.

Did you find not so fun facts while researching your book?

The premise for The Methuselah Project involves a hush-hush German experiment that used Allied prisoners as guinea pigs. Although the actual experiment in my novel is fictitious, Nazi scientists truly did experiment on captives, particularly Jews in the concentration camps. Reading accounts of those experiments qualifies as “not so fun.” The experiment in my own story is much less gruesome.

Does coincidence play a role in your book? If so, what was strangest coincidence you experienced and did you use it in your book?

I’m not a big fan of coincidences in fiction, although some authors and scriptwriters lean heavily on coincidence. (For example, the first Star Wars movie. I mean, really? Princess Leia hides blueprints of the Death Star in an android, which “just happens” to end up in the possession of–of all people in the galaxy–her biological brother, whom she has never met or heard of? That’s a biggie. But fans swallowed it.) The closest thing to a coincidence in my book is the fact that Captain Roger Greene ends up in Atlanta, Georgia, where he meets the main female character, Katherine. But because they are not related in any way, and because the shadowy “organization” manipulates Katherine into keeping tabs on Roger, I don’t see this as coincidence. The organization simply used her proximity to give her a mission. If Captain Greene had been in New York, they might have put another member on his tail.

What is the story behind the creation of your book?

Since I grew up in the home of a pilot, I’ve had a lifelong interest in aviation. Also, WW II has interested me since 7th grade. A third spark for this tale is my interest in a well-told story about time travel. These three elements combined in my imagination. Even though Captain Greene doesn’t literally travel in time, he does end up looking young and still athletic many decades after the war, but with a biologically reasonable explanation that satisfies readers who don’t like sci-fi.

What do you like most about writing? What do you like least?

There’s a special literary adrenaline that feels great when the words and inspiration fuse to produce a hot stream of words flowing from my imagination to my fingers and then onto the computer screen. It’s a wonderfully satisfying experience. The least enjoyable? When I’m stuck in the Sahara Desert of imagination. My trail has led me thus far, and I know of another point in the journey I must reach, but am not sure how to get from this dry valley to that point in a way that will intrigue the reader to stick with me.

Are you working on the next book?

Yes, although with frequent delays as I (too often!) must set aside that project in order to freelance edit, or write an article, or translate something from Russian to English to keep money coming in to pay the bills.

Tell us how long it took you to write your book.

About a year. I wrote it in spurts–a half hour or so in the early morning. Fifteen or twenty minutes during my lunch break. Sometimes an hour in the evening. It’s frustrating to close the Microsoft program when you know exactly what the next line will be, but that’s the life of a part-time writer. Anyone who assumes authors are specially entitled people with huge blocks of spare time for writing is kidding himself. To get started as a writer, you must carve writing time out of your day, protecting and using minutes other people will fritter away with Facebook or Solitaire or TV.

What’s next for you in writing?

Many readers have wished for a sequel to The Methuselah Project. I plan to answer that wish.

Well, please keep us updated and let us know the release date. Thank you for visiting with us today. We have enjoyed learning more about Rick Barry.

Please be sure and check out Rick’s website and social medias.

http://rickcbarry.com/

facebook.com/AuthorRickBarry, or on Twitter (@WriterRickBarry)

Advertisements

Heather Blanton–Lady in Defiance

Heather Blanton ph    Heather Blanton––Lady in Defiance

Heather said, “I believe Christian fiction should be messy and gritty, because the human condition is … and God loves us anyway.” –

A former journalist, and avid researcher you skillfully weave truth in among fictional story lines. I understand you love to explore the American West.

Yes, especially ghost towns and museums. I’ve walked parts of the Oregon Trail, ridden horses through the Rockies, climbed to the top of Independence Rock, and even held an outlaw’s note in my hand.

No wonder your books bring our western culture to life.

You write Christian Westerns. Besides your love of the west is there another reason?

I get to write about strong pioneer women and men who struggle to find God and then live out their faith in real ways. Romance is always a strong element in my stories because it is such a beautiful gift from God, and a perfect reflection of how he loves His children: sacrificially and lavishly.

You have been able to write Christian Westerns without being preachy or cheesy.

Like good old-fashioned Westerns, there is always justice, a moral message, American values, and lots of high adventure, unexpected plot twists, and more than a touch of suspense. I think readers find my stories heart-warming, realistic, illuminating and glorifying to God.

Where do you think this love for the west stems from?

I think it’s because I grew up on a steady diet of Bonanza, Gunsmoke, and John Wayne movies. My fondest childhood memory is of sitting next to my father, munching on popcorn, and watching Lucas McCain unload that Winchester!

I can relate to your love for the old west. I loved the western movies growing up. Every Saturday afternoon was movies and then home to recreate those Roy Rogers and Gene Autry movies. We loved that era.

You are the bestselling independent author of several Christian Westerns, including the Romance in the Rockies series.

This  series, Intrigued by the concept of three good sisters stranded in a lawless Colorado mining town, caused a few notable Hollywood producers to request the script for my first book in that series.

trio of heather    book1    book 2

You’ve been called “A Lady in Defiance” and your writing is gritty and realistic. In fact, your books have been compared to AMC’s Hell on Wheels series, as well as the legendary Francine Rivers book, Redeeming Love. You just released Romance in the Rockies Books 1, 2, & 3 Plus The Lost Chapters.

Readers now can get all three of the bestselling Defiance books in ONE collection, along with a BONUS, never-before-published prequel novella, The Lost Chapters.

Heather, we wish you continuing success in your writing. We enjoy reading your work so we can’t wait to read this one.

Thank you for visiting with us today.

 

To learn more about Heather visit her website: https://ladiesindefiance.com/ and get her newsletter.

https://www.facebook.com/heatherfreyblanton https://twitter.com/heatherfblanton
https://www.pinterest.com/heatherfblanton/

 

The Master of Thrills-Steve Berry

 

NEW Steve_Berry_3242 (1)  Meet author Steve Berry.  His trademark is a mix of history and suspense, 90% fact and 10% exciting speculation. He takes this combination and creates riveting thrillers. Some of our readers may not know that he is a founding member of International Thriller Writers—a group of more than 2,600 thriller writers from around the world.

 

We are so excited to have Steve Berry as our visitor today. To welcome him we have prepared a Mocha Morning Drink. 

mocha morning drinkexps17904_QC10250D56

6 cups hot brewed coffee, ¾ cup half-and-half cream, 6 tablespoons chocolate syrup, 7 teaspoons sugar, 6 cinnamon sticks, whipped cream (optional). In a large saucepan, combine the coffee, cream, chocolate syrup and sugar. Cook and stir over medium heat until sugar is dissolved and mixture is heated through. Ladle into six large mugs. Stir with a cinnamon stick. Garnish with whipped cream if desired. Yield: 6 servings.

Read more: http://www.tasteofhome.com/recipes/mocha-morning-drink#ixzz3WT8Z2ak3

 

Good morning Steve, welcome to Authors Visit. Your newest book, The Patriot Threat just released. Tell us a little about the book. 

Patriot Threat - final  The 16th Amendment to the Constitution is why Americans pay income taxes. But what if there were problems associated with that amendment? Secrets that call into question decades of tax collecting? In fact, there is a surprising truth to this hidden possibility. 

My protagonist Cotton Malone, once a member of an elite intelligence division within the Justice Department known as the Magellan Billet, is now retired and owns an old bookshop in Denmark. But when his former-boss, Stephanie Nelle, asks him to track a rogue North Korean who may have acquired some top-secret Treasury Department files–the kind that could bring the United States to its knees–Malone is vaulted into a harrowing twenty-four hour chase that begins on the canals in Venice and ends in the remote highlands of Croatia.

I’ve read the book, and I have to tell you, it was riveting. It has your non-stop adventure trademark. It was a great thriller…and the question you posed about income tax being illegal left me dumbfounded. I really liked the appearances of Franklin Roosevelt, Andrew Mellon, and the painting that hangs in the National Gallery of Art. The part with the $1 bill…well, I immediately went to get a $1 bill and looked…I won’t give that away right here. We’ll let others find it as they read your book. And it is a must read.

You obviously have a passion for history as it lies at the heart of your novels.

Yes, it is my passion, one I share with my wife, Elizabeth. It led us to create History Matters, a foundation dedicated to historic preservation. Since 2009 we have crossed the country to save endangered historic treasures, raising money via lectures, receptions, galas, luncheons, dinners and writers workshops. To date, over 2,500 students have attended those workshops and we’ve raised nearly a million dollars for preservation.

In 2012 and 2013 your devotion to historic preservation was recognized by the American Library Association, they named you the spokesperson for National Preservation Week. Among his other honors are the Royden B. Davis Distinguished Author Award; the 2013 Barnes & Noble Writers for Writers Award given by Poets & Writers; the 2013 Anne Frank Human Writes Award; and the Silver Bullet, bestowed in 2013 by International Thriller Writers for his philanthropic work. A 2010 NPR survey named The Templar Legacy one of the top 100 thrillers ever written.

I know your books are research intensive. Can you tell us a little about it?

I utilize many second-hand volumes, visiting old bookshops around the world.  I use around 200-300 sources for each novel. Sometimes on site research is necessary in order to fully develop the story.  With The Patriot Threat, I went to Venice, Croatia, And Washington D.C.  I flew to Russia for The Amber Room and The Romanov Prophecy and to Rome for The Third Secret. Time in France was necessary for The Templar Legacy. A visit to the abbey at Belem, in Portugal, helped complete The Alexandria Link. Trips to Venice for The Venetian Betrayal and Germany for The Charlemagne Pursuit were also productive. For The Paris Vendetta  I spent four days in the city of lights. To create The Jefferson Key, I visited Virginia, North Carolina, Washington D.C., and New York City. The Columbus Affair required a few days in both Prague and Jamaica, where I discovered an interesting link between those two locales.  For The King’s Deception, I made two trips to London and its surrounding communities.

Patriot Threat - final    AmberRoom-cvr-thumb     Romanov-cvr-thumb   ThirdSecret-cvr-thumb   TemplarLegacy-cvr-thumb (1)   Alexandria-cvr-thumb   venetianbetrayal-cvr-thumb   TheCharlemagnePursuit-cvr-thumb   TheParisVendetta-cvr-thumb   Jefferson-Key-cvr-thumb   ColumbusAffair_MM_flat-thumb   KingsDeceptionMM-cvr-thumb2 (1)

 

I have heard that it is a possibility that your Cotton Malone books may come to TV in a series.  Without giving too much information, can you comment on that?

The Cotton Malone series has been bought by Alcon Entertainment. So there is interest in a television series focused around the books and Cotton. Hopefully, that development effort will prove successful and Cotton might come to life on the small screen.

I have to tell you, I for one would be thrilled. I love the Cotton Malone character. I know you have many reader fans that would be watching that series. I hope you will keep us posted on that as it moves along.

Cover March 2015 medYou were just interviewed in Southern Writers Magazine’s March/April issue and you were on the cover. I really enjoyed learning about your writing techniques. I especially learned a lot about your character’s voices–– in how you keep them from getting lost amid the other voices. 

It’s important that the characters not sound the same.  You achieve this through a careful use of diction and syntax — the choice and order of the words.

I appreciated you sharing that technique with us on how you accomplish this. For writers who are interested in checking this out just click on the magazine above. 

What’s next for Steve Berry?

Cotton Malone will be back in 2016 and 2017 with more exciting adventures.  The 2016 novel is finished and I’m writing the 2017 book.

I want to thank you for joining us today. Again, I really enjoyed your new book. So did my husband. I like your writing style, especially since it keeps me interested all the way to the end. Thank you for such interesting books.

Please come back and visit soon.

Be sure and check out Steve Berry’s website and learn more about him. 

http://steveberry.org/

Until Next Time-Happy Reading!