Tag Archive | fiction

Bob Srother––A Page Turning Author

We welcome Bbob strother photoob Strother with us today.

We’ve known Bob Strother for since the beginning of Southern Writers Magazine. He is a master at writing short stories and his short stories have been published in numerous magazines.

Bob, you wrote a book called Burning Time. David Burnsworth, author of the Brack Pelton Mystery Series said,Burning Time is a page-turner of historical fiction! Strother is a class act whose prose does not disappoint. He has mastered the art of rooting the reader in the time-period and then supported that with a great coming of age tale.”

Tell us about the book.

Set in Chattanooga, Tennessee, in the early 1900s, Burning Time  portrays the life of Louise Schmidt, from early childhood to adulthood, as Louise, her mother, and younger brother fight to survive the abuse of Louise’s father, Will.bob strother book_

 The largess of Will’s parents initially provides refuge from her father’s drunken exploits, but Louise learns too young that nothing lasts forever. Though previously ostracized from the family, the prodigal son returns at the behest of his ailing father, and brings along a new wife, Maude, who fans the flames of Will’s inherent avarice and disregard for his former wife and children.

At fifteen, Louise is forced from the only home she’s ever known and into marriage with a man ten years her senior.  Even as Louise comes to terms with her life and assumes the role of family matriarch, she still must face the consequences of her actions—including a death sentence for murder.

Susan M. Boyer, USA TODAY bestselling author of the Liz Talbot Mystery Series said, “One-part Southern Gothic, one part crime novel, one part coming-of-age story, Burning Time is a compelling read I couldn’t put down. It’s beautifully delivered in Strother’s clear, concise prose and authentic Southern voice.

Now, you have a new historical novel out, A Fire To Be Kindled, the sequel to Burning Time.

Tell us about it.

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This sequel begins with the Roaring Twenties. Cleared of murder charges and finally free of her father’s tyranny, Louise, it would seem, has it all. With money in the bank, she branches out into other business ventures. Meanwhile, the family delights in young Bobby’s escapades while See-Boy builds a lucrative, albeit shady, side business. But, as Louise knows all too well, hard times are always just around the corner. As the Great Depression besieges the country, Louise and her family suffer personal trials — an unwanted pregnancy, clandestine love affairs, and unseen forces scheming behind the scenes to tear apart everything Louise has, including her family.

Wow, well we will be reading this sequel. You did an excellent job weaving your story and characters together in Burning Time, I definitely want to see what happens in this new book.

Bob, thank you for visiting with us today. I know readers are going to love this sequel. Can’t wait to read it. Thanks for being such a wonderful supporter of Southern Writers Magazine.

To order Bob’s book Burning Tree go to:

https://moonshinereview.wordpress.com/moonshine-press-releases/burning-time-new-publication-by-moonshine-press/

To Order his new book A Fire to be Kindled:

https://moonshinereview.wordpress.com/moonshine-press-releases/new-a-fire-to-be-kindled-bob-strother

Be sure and visit Bob at: https://www.facebook.com/bob.strother

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Jordan Dane-Wrapping Us In Suspense

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Meet Jordan Dane, author of  suspense. She knows how to develop those gritty plots that keep you turning the pages. We are delighted to have Jordan here today to learn more about this new book, The Last Victim.

To welcome Jordan we are having one of her favorite coffee drinks, (she loves chocolate like so many of us do) a Mocha Morning coffee. Here is the recipe, fix you a cup and join us.

  • 6 cups hot brewed coffee
  • 3/4 cup half-and-half cream
  • 6 tablespoons chocolate syrup
  • 7 teaspoons sugar
  • 6 cinnamon sticks (3 inches)
  • Whipped cream in a can, optional

Directions: In a large saucepan, combine the coffee, cream, chocolate syrup and sugar. Cook and stir over medium heat until sugar is dissolved and mixture is heated through. Ladle into six large mugs. Stir with a cinnamon stick. Garnish with whipped cream if desired. Yield: 6 servings. (http://www.tasteofhome.com/recipes/mocha-morning-drink)

Thank you Susan.

Tell us a little about your newest book, The Last Victim.

last victim51z0j3LWBlL._UY250_A hunting guide from a remote island in Alaska is found  murdered, FBI profiler,  Ryker Townsend and his specialized team investigate. A nightmarish clue brings Ryker closer to a killer who knows how to hide in plain sight and will see him coming.

Wow. Sounds like a book you want to curl up with in the winter for sure.

What brought about the writing of this story? Is there a purpose behind the story that you want your readers to know?

 I’ve never written a psychological thriller or a story about a serial killer, so I took it as a challenge. (I like writing books that keep me off-balance and slightly unsure.) I chose this story-line to put my spin on it and set the novel in one of my favorite settings – Alaska – where I lived for ten years. Many of my main character’s experiences (FBI profiler, Ryker Townsend), a city guy in the remote wilds of Alaska for the first time, were drawn from my own experiences. I was an urban goddess who is lucky to have survived. While in Alaska, I camped and backpacked, climbed mountains, kayaked, fished, and flew in very small planes, often taking off and landing on iced rivers and lakes. I was a checkpoint operator on the Iditarod Trail in the dead of winter for the International Iditaski Cross Country Ski & Snowshoe race.  I  experienced many close encounters with bears and moose. So I wrote my thoughts and feelings into Ryker but added the frightening layer of hunting a serial killer on foreign turf. Personally, facing a grizzly might be a better bet.

What was the most challenging part in writing this story?

The biggest challenge was trying to even remotely understand the evil human beings can inflict on one another. I tend to write novels that seem ripped from the headlines because I want my books to read as authentic. In The Last Victim, for example, I write about a software app that is frightening when put into the hands of a criminal. That app is real, unfortunately. (I only changed the name.) I discovered the app in my research and asked the important writer question “what if…”. Scary to think of something so innocent could be used for such a heinous purpose, or that someone posting to social media could put themselves in the path of a killer.  Crime fiction authors have fertile minds for mischief and mayhem. I scare myself often. We should all give serious consideration to therapy.

Did it require a lot of research and if so what kind?

I did quite a lot of research in profiling and serial killers, focusing on non-fiction authors with a long successful career in FBI profiling. I even attended a lecture from a former FBI profiler (turned Criminology professor) who had shared his haunting interview with Charles Manson. Such insights helped me mold the darker elements to my story. It’s not easy delving into the sinister side of the human mind. I have much respect for real profilers who have to unleash their dark side to hunt such evil.

What’s next?

I’m focusing on the next book in the Ryker Townsend series. I’m getting great response from this first book with readers wanting more. I had an American version of Benedict Cumberbatch’s Sherlock Holmes (Masterpiece Theatre/BBC America) and actor Tom Mison’s Icabod Crane from Fox’s SleepyHollow in mind when I developed my main character (Ryker Townsend) but added a psychic twist to the character that made him a tortured soul driven to keep his secrets. I love him being in my head. No matter how crazy that makes me sound, at least I’m never alone.