Tag Archive | Faith

rick barry  If you haven’t met Rick Barry, then you definitely need to. He’s authored three novels: Gunner’s Run, Kiriath’s Quest, and most recently The Methuselah Project. In addition, he has hundreds of published articles and short stories to his credit.

But that’s not all, Rick speaks Russian, and served in the home offices of two ministries aimed at the former USSR. preaching

By God’s grace, I have visited Eastern Europe over 50 times and worked in Christian camps for children and teens.

His experiences have included skydiving, mountain climbing, rappelling, camping in Russia, kayaking, wilderness hiking, white-water rafting, visiting World War II battlegrounds, even prowling deserted apartments in the evacuated Chernobyl district of Ukraine. He believes that all experiences in life provide fuel for a writer’s imagination. And, he has also served multi-terms as president of American Christian Fiction Writers (ACFW) – Indiana Chapter.

In your newest book, The Methuselah Project, was your book research intensive? Did you find some fun facts?

rick barry book

Definitely. In my experience, writing a novel set at any point in past history requires research, especially if the time period is World War II, which continues to interest the public widely. If your details are inaccurate, there are amateur historians who will shoot you down. As bad as that feels for the author, I believe it hurts worse for the reader, who can no longer enjoy the story knowing that the author hasn’t done the homework and doesn’t really know what he or she is talking about. Fun facts that I learned might bore others, but they include flight characteristics of a P-47 fighter plane and historical details concerning Plainfield, Indiana, the childhood home of my hero.

Did you find not so fun facts while researching your book?

The premise for The Methuselah Project involves a hush-hush German experiment that used Allied prisoners as guinea pigs. Although the actual experiment in my novel is fictitious, Nazi scientists truly did experiment on captives, particularly Jews in the concentration camps. Reading accounts of those experiments qualifies as “not so fun.” The experiment in my own story is much less gruesome.

Does coincidence play a role in your book? If so, what was strangest coincidence you experienced and did you use it in your book?

I’m not a big fan of coincidences in fiction, although some authors and scriptwriters lean heavily on coincidence. (For example, the first Star Wars movie. I mean, really? Princess Leia hides blueprints of the Death Star in an android, which “just happens” to end up in the possession of–of all people in the galaxy–her biological brother, whom she has never met or heard of? That’s a biggie. But fans swallowed it.) The closest thing to a coincidence in my book is the fact that Captain Roger Greene ends up in Atlanta, Georgia, where he meets the main female character, Katherine. But because they are not related in any way, and because the shadowy “organization” manipulates Katherine into keeping tabs on Roger, I don’t see this as coincidence. The organization simply used her proximity to give her a mission. If Captain Greene had been in New York, they might have put another member on his tail.

What is the story behind the creation of your book?

Since I grew up in the home of a pilot, I’ve had a lifelong interest in aviation. Also, WW II has interested me since 7th grade. A third spark for this tale is my interest in a well-told story about time travel. These three elements combined in my imagination. Even though Captain Greene doesn’t literally travel in time, he does end up looking young and still athletic many decades after the war, but with a biologically reasonable explanation that satisfies readers who don’t like sci-fi.

What do you like most about writing? What do you like least?

There’s a special literary adrenaline that feels great when the words and inspiration fuse to produce a hot stream of words flowing from my imagination to my fingers and then onto the computer screen. It’s a wonderfully satisfying experience. The least enjoyable? When I’m stuck in the Sahara Desert of imagination. My trail has led me thus far, and I know of another point in the journey I must reach, but am not sure how to get from this dry valley to that point in a way that will intrigue the reader to stick with me.

Are you working on the next book?

Yes, although with frequent delays as I (too often!) must set aside that project in order to freelance edit, or write an article, or translate something from Russian to English to keep money coming in to pay the bills.

Tell us how long it took you to write your book.

About a year. I wrote it in spurts–a half hour or so in the early morning. Fifteen or twenty minutes during my lunch break. Sometimes an hour in the evening. It’s frustrating to close the Microsoft program when you know exactly what the next line will be, but that’s the life of a part-time writer. Anyone who assumes authors are specially entitled people with huge blocks of spare time for writing is kidding himself. To get started as a writer, you must carve writing time out of your day, protecting and using minutes other people will fritter away with Facebook or Solitaire or TV.

What’s next for you in writing?

Many readers have wished for a sequel to The Methuselah Project. I plan to answer that wish.

Well, please keep us updated and let us know the release date. Thank you for visiting with us today. We have enjoyed learning more about Rick Barry.

Please be sure and check out Rick’s website and social medias.

http://rickcbarry.com/

facebook.com/AuthorRickBarry, or on Twitter (@WriterRickBarry)

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Amy Clipston-Knows the Meaning of Success in Life

clipstonpublicity    Today we are delighted to have Amy Clipston visiting with us. Amy is an Amish and Christian Author. She is a native of New Jersey, but on graduation from high school, she and her parents moved to Virginia Beach, Virginia, where she met her husband, her senior year in college at Virginia Wesleyan College in Norfolk.

Tell us about the beginnings of your writing.

I was surfing the Internet for a professional editor’s group one day and accidentally found a local fiction writing group, Chesapeake Romance Writers. I attended a meeting and met writers in all stages of their careers. They helped me realize I did want to be an author, and it was my dream to see my name on the cover of one of my novels. Through this group, I learned how to plot, write, and edit a novel, and how to pursue an agent. I signed with Mary Sue Seymour at the Seymour Agency in 2006, shortly before Joe and I moved my parents and our sons to North Carolina.

giftofgrace_thumb“My dream came true when I sold my first book in 2007. Holding my first book, A Gift of Grace, in my hands was exhilarating and surreal.”

Tell us how your Amish series came about.

I love writing about the Amish. An Amish friend in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, reads my manuscripts for accuracy. I was always fascinated with the Amish when I was a child. I remember visiting Lancaster County, and my father, who was a German immigrant, told me that the Amish speak the same dialect of German as my relatives. I was drawn to their simplicity and faith. Due to my German heritage, I feel a loose connection to the Amish and their culture.

“My plots come straight from my heart and all involve family issues intertwined with faith.”

We are always asking our author visitors what is something they would like their readers to know about them that they don’t know. Amy Clipston graciously shares her answer with us.

Some readers may not know that my husband, Joe, has endured two kidney transplants. Joe received a kidney from his brother in 2004, and it only lasted four years.  In 2008, he went back on dialysis, and he was very ill. I was willing to donate to Joe, but I wasn’t a perfect match. Instead of donating a kidney to Joe, I found another way to help him.

I donated a kidney through the paired donation program on June 14, 2011, at Johns Hopkins Hospital. Through my donation, my husband, Joe, received a second kidney transplant. My husband and I matched another couple and swapped kidneys with them. I donated a kidney to a woman, and in exchange, her husband gave a kidney to Joe. I wrote a memoir called A Gift of Love, which tells our story of how we fought Joe’s kidney disease.

 

Due to Joe’s kidney struggles, I’ve become an advocate for both organ and blood donation. I volunteer with the National Kidney Foundation, and I run blood drives at my church. If you are healthy and able, please give the gift of life and donate blood!

Gift of love You share yours and your husband’s story in a memoir called A Gift of Love that released March 2014.

“Anyone is free to email me and ask me what it was like to be a kidney donor. It was one of the most amazing experiences in my life. If you’re healthy, please donate blood! Also, become an organ donor.

Wow, thank you Amy, first for sharing that with us and for becoming an advocate for organ and blood donations.

Every author has a memory about how it feels to hold their book when it is published and sent to them. Amy describes what if feels like for her.

Oh, there’s nothing like it!  I jump up and down and screech like a child on Christmas morning when I see the boxes waiting for me on the porch.  I then call my sons and ask them to help carry in the boxes. Once a box is open, I pick up the book, touch the cover, hug it, and breathe in that awesome smell of new book. It never gets old, and I’m thankful for each book.

Your also write Young Adult books. Tell us about those.

“I wrote my first Young Adult book, Roadside Assistance in 2011 and the sequel, Destination Unknown 2014. The third book in the series, Miles from Nowhere release in April 2015.roadside_thumb    destination_unknown_thumb   MilesfromNowhere-small

You are an author who has learned how to balance her family life and her writing life. I understand you are a member of the Authors Guild, American Christian Fiction Writers, and Romance Writers of America.

“Yes, and I work full-time for the City of Charlotte. My chaotic home includes my husband, Joe; two sons, Zac and Matt; mother, Lola; and four spoiled rotten cats…Molly, Rico, Jet and Lilly.”

When authors are writing their books and see them published we like to know what that author would like the reader to take away with them after reading the book.

I believe the recurring themes in my books are faith and hope. I think those themes are subconsciously woven into my books due to what I’ve endured with my husband’s kidney disease. We faced some tough times, but we persevered with our faith.  I hope that my books will give readers a sense of peace and help them find a renewed hope and faith in God.

You were just highlighted in the March/April 2015 Southern Writers Magazine in What’s The Story. Thank you for participating in the magazine.Cover March 2015 med

 We also thank you for coming today and can’t wait until your next book releases.  Please drop us a note about it.

 Visit Amy Clipston at her website and learn more about her.

 

http://www.amyclipston.com/