Tag Archive | Authors Visits

Larissa Reinhart~Southern Author

larissa reinhart321

If you’re looking for stories about strong, sassy heroines who tend to find trouble without even trying, then you want to read Larissa Reinhart’s books.

Welcome to Author’s Visits. Today Larissa Reinhart is visiting.

Larissa, A Wall Street Journal bestselling author and 2015 Georgia Author of the Year Best Mystery finalist. She writes the Cherry Tucker Mystery and Maizie Albright Star Detective series and the Finley Goodhart Crime Caper series, and various romantic comedies. She loves books, food, and traveling with her family. 

I’ve been waiting to find out about your new book that just released, View to a Chill.

Cherry Tucker suffers from flu-induced visions of murder, while Maizie Albright’s on the hunt for a missing granddaughter whose criminal stockings have long been filled with coal.view to a chill

Wow, Have Cherry and Maizie in the same book is going to be fantastic. I really can’t wait to get it.

I understand they are making movies in your part of the country.

I live in Peachtree City, Georgia (when I’m not in Japan) and the TV and movie industry has exploded here. Georgia is now the number one state to make movies, surpassing California and New York. About four years ago, the huge UK film company, Pinewood Studios, built their America studios a few miles from my house. Acres and acres of giant soundstages and the like. Now big blockbuster movies, like all the recent Marvel movies, are filmed here. About five miles away in the other direction, is the little town of Senoia and that’s where The Walking Dead films. AMC just bought the studio TWD uses, so I’m sure more AMC television shows will be here. Sony Pictures bought property nearby, too. We started with Fried Green Tomatoes in Senoia back in 1991, and the movie people have been coming here ever since.

I take that back. Actually, Smokey and the Bandit filmed around here back in 1977. We just celebrated the 40th anniversary this summer.

The film industry in a place like small-town Georgia is a such a great setting. Lots of interesting paradoxes. Plus big money means more interesting crime, which is good for mysteries.

Tell us about your book,16 MINUTES, the book in your Maizie Albright Star Detective series.

You know Susan, I have so much fun with these books.

16 minutes

I had this character, Maizie Albright. She’s about 180 degrees different from my redneck artist character, Cherry Tucker. Maizie was raised in California in the movie industry. A child star with an extremely driven stage-mother. Maizie’s daddy remained in Georgia — she’s a child of divorce — and I get my redneck element with him and his family. But he’s the CEO of DeerNose Corp, clothing and accessories scented with deer pee. A corporate redneck. He’s famous in his own right, on the cover of every (fictional) hunting and gaming magazine you can think of. So two driven parents and this young woman who’s spent much of her youth living someone else’s dream. The happiest point in her childhood was starring in this TV show as a teen detective. So after crashing and burning in Hollywood, she returns to Georgia (on judge’s orders) to pursue her own dream: becoming a real-life detective.

In 16 MILLIMETERS,  she’s continuing her career-makeover quest as a for-real detective. Wyatt Nash has Maizie working in the office —where the clients are few and far between — while he’s doing the few-and-far-between security solutions. Maizie’s a little bored and a lot frustrated (both career-wise and romantically). When a major movie producer needs a babysitter for his hot mess starlet, Maizie eagerly takes the job. Nash is not happy with the decision. And when her starlet appears dead and then not dead, Maizie scrambles to watch an actress who seems determined to screw up her career plus find this missing corpse. And she keeps finding more bodies. Maizie’s hunting a killer who may be a celebrity stalker. And Maizie might be the next celebrity who gets snuffed.

Was your book research intensive? Did you find some fun facts?

Research is a delicate balance while writing for me because I’ll get sucked into the internet looking for a fact for one sentence. My family was on HGTV’s House Hunters International while we were in Japan (our episode’s called “Living for the Weekend in Nagoya, Japan”) and that’s helped me with some background in how reality shows can be filmed.

Did you find a not so fun fact while researching your book?

I was shocked (ha) at the number of actors who underwent shock treatment, particularly in the 1940s. There’s such a strong correlation between mental illness and artists. I deal with it lightly in the series, mainly in Maizie’s remarks about the stars she’s met in rehab, but I  try to deal with it respectfully. There’s a chicken and the egg syndrome between fame and depression. They feed each which I find poignant.

What do you like most about writing? What do you like least?

I love creating story ideas. They’re always popping in my head, which makes it hard to concentrate on the book I’m currently writing. I love the premise of an idea, new characters; when a book feels like it’s writing itself. I sometimes find myself surprised by what happens after I write it. That’s such an exciting tingly feeling.

The readers are the best part of writing, though. When I get an email from a reader who’s been going through a difficult time — an illness, a death, job loss, etc. — and they tell me my books have helped them escape that for a little while…it makes me cry every time. I get so much personal fulfillment in knowing I helped them in this very insignificant way. I’ve been there. Books are my escape, too.

Tell us something fun you like to do.

Now that we’re not traveling around Japan, we spend a lot of weekends seeking out BBQ in Georgia. My husband smokes pulled pork as a serious hobby. We’re huge BBQ fanatics, so we take a lot of pleasure in finding local spots for BBQ.

We are so delighted you visited with us today. Love reading your books, they always give me a much-needed break from my everyday world.  Keep up the writing!

Start looking for her next book, The Cupid Caper

Be sure and visit Larissa at https://www.larissareinhart.com/

https://www.facebook.com/larissareinhartwriter

 

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Richard L. Mabry-Medical Suspense With Heart.

richard mabry new  I want to welcome Dr. Richard Mabry today. We are very honored to have him visit. In addition to practicing medicine, you will find his past as interesting as his novels. He was in the US Air Force overseas, several periods as an interim music minister and as he says, “An all-too-brief experience as a semi-pro baseball player.” 

As a physician he has had lots of opportunities to write through his time as a doctor. 

“During the 36 years I spent in medicine, I wrote or edited eight textbooks, authored over a hundred professional papers, and an invited guest speaker all over the world.”

You also held the presidency or vice-presidency of three professional societies,  received a number of awards and honors.

“Yes, but if you asked my greatest reward in medicine, it would be in seeing patients get better under my care.”

Before I ask you about your newest book, I would like to talk a little bit about your first non-medical book you wrote. The Tender Scar: Life After The Death Of A Spouse.tender scar

I wrote that book after after the death of my first wife. The book offers hope and healing for the brokenhearted. It addresses the heart-wrenching pain of losing a spouse. Working from my journal entries written after the death of my wife, I use my journey as a stepping-stone to a practical discussion of the grief process. The second edition of this book includes a new chapter that highlights the process of building a second marriage and blended family after loss. I’m gratified that it continues to help those who have lost a loved one.

No wonder it is still selling today. 

Tell me about your newest release, Surgeons Choice.

SurgeonsChoice

Dr. Ben Merrick and his fiancé, Rachel Gardner, can’t get her divorced parents to stay in the same room, much less attend their wedding together.  He is also looking over his shoulder expecting more trouble from a very senior surgeon who has shown he is still smarting from a previous dust-up. Ben doesn’t know if a series of mishaps and accidents are caused by a disgruntled patient’s relatives or represent more from the older surgeon.

Then his prospective father-in-law approaches him, needing money for reasons Ben can’t fathom. Rachel has an idea about the cause of the request, but she doesn’t want to accept it. Then, when the deaths begin, Ben and Rachel begin to wonder if they can escape unscathed…and alive.

Can’t wait to read this one Richard. Everything I’ve read backs up your words “I write what I call medical suspense with heart”.

Your novels have been finalists for the ACFW Carol Award, Romantic Times’ Best Inspirational Novel and their Reviewer’s Choice Award; won the Selah award, and been named by Christian Retailing as the best in the mystery/suspense/thriller category.
I have to bring up your book Silent Night, Deadly Night; it’s a page turner. Great job. I really like the cover! Please share a little of this book with our readers.
The colored lights on the snow give it a holiday appearance, but the dead woman’s body in the yard add’s a grisly touch. Everyone wants to know how  Ina Bell Patrick died?
Who killed her? And why?silent nitghtThe dead woman had no direct heirs, so two nephews and a niece stood to inherit. Dr. Laura Morris was left to make all the arrangements, attorney Roger Morris could certainly use the money, and Zack Morris had disappeared two years earlier. Then there was a neighbor and “best friend” Fay Autrey, who was certain the woman intended to leave her some money—a great deal of money.The police were still looking for the killer who left the frozen body in the snow when it became apparent someone was trying to pick off the heirs, one by one. You begin to wonder who is going to win win the race—the police or the killer?

If readers haven’t read it, they need to get it now. They want want to put it down either.
Thank you Richard for joining us today. Look forward to reading your newest book, Surgeons Choice.
You can follow Richard L. Mabry, M.D. on his blog (rmabry.blogspot.com) and his web page (rmabry.com), as well as Facebook (rmabrybooks) and Twitter (RichardMabry).

 

Growing Up in 1956! by Thomas Conner

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Meet Thomas Conner, known to some as Tom, others as Tommy, and TC by friends and family. Although born in Florida, two miles from the Alabama state line, he spent most of his early years living on the Alabama side and went to college in Florida. 

He graduated from the University of West Florida in Pensacola with a Bachelor of Arts degree in Humanities and since 1980  has resided in Central California’s Big Valley, where he has worked in higher education at a prestigious private university in Student Life.

Tom, welcome to Authos Visits. I am excited to talk to you about this book, Goodby, Saturday Night.

goodnight saturday nightYour book, Goodbye, Saturday Night, is very interesting, and for us who are older brings back a lot of memories.

Tell us a little about the book.

Well it’s early  May 1956 in the small South Alabama town of Farmington, and eleven year old Bobby Crosby’s life is about to change forever. He’s still anguishing over the death of his father even though it’s been five years, and he’s come to despise the life centered around his mother’s cafe, a place that turns into the revelrous hot spot of the community when the sun goes down. Bobby escapes his real world by sitting every night in the local movie theater, third row left down front. There, alone in the dark, he leaves Farmington far behind and melts into the world of the silver screen. Bobby’s best friend is Hucker Nolan, a twenty-two year old drop-out from the swamps across the tracks who drives a taxicab in the daytime and works concession at the movie theater at night. Now, Bobby’s world seems to be collapsing and there’s nothing he can do to stop it; his mother has a boyfriend Bobby desperately resents and his feelings for Hucker are confusing and ever changing, often filled with anger and jealousy Bobby doesn’t understand. Then, the worst thing possible happens to Bobby— he’s betrayed by the person he trusts the most.

Was your book research intensive? Did you find some fun facts?

Yes, definitely. The book is set in 1956 and required a lot of research because I give lots of details in my writing. My character paid 5 cents for a soda. The Western Flyer Super Deluxe bicycle he dreamed of cost $75 and was unobtainable. I also used movie and music references throughout the book, so I had to research the release dates to make sure I wasn’t using titles that hadn’t been released in May of 1956. A good example of this is Saturday night television line-up in 1956. I really wanted one of my characters to be watching Gunsmoke on T.V. when he was called away for an emergency. Well, the show didn’t air at the time I needed him to be watching it, so I had him watch “The Jackie Gleason Show” instead.

Did you find not so fun facts while researching your book?

Yes, and some very disturbing. This book is based very loosely on my childhood growing up in the Deep South. My main character has a close friend who is “colored” but they cannot sit together in the movies. My character lives in a racial bubble, just as I did at the time. When researching racial tension in Alabama in the 1950s and 1960s, I was made aware of much more racially related violence than I had previously known. I knew of the Selma marches of 1965 but I had no idea of the violence and brutality involved until I began my research. It was played down in my area and among my family and friends.

Does coincidence play a role in your book? If so, what was the strangest coincidence experienced and did you use it in your book?

Yes, most definitely. In the past, we have had two Sunday services at my church, St. Anne’s Episcopal. I always attended the 10:00am service. Early last spring our services were combined into one at 9:00am. That offered an opportunity to meet folks from the other service I didn’t know. One Sunday, I struck up a conversation at coffee hour with a woman who had just published her second novel with a small publishing house. I told her about my book, that I was planning on self-publishing because I didn’t want to go through all those hundreds of rejections until I found a house that would take my book. She suggested I submit my work to her publisher. After mulling it over for a few weeks I did and they immediately offered me a publishing contract. My friend and I had been attending the same church for many years without knowing each other or that we were both writers. Now, we are authors with the same publishing house because our church services were combined

What is the story behind the creation your book?

When I read Larry McMurtry’s The Last Picture Show in the mid 1970s, I realized I had a book in me about small town life in Alabama in the 1950s. I met Larry McMurtry at his rare and collectible bookstore, Booked Up, in the Georgetown section of Washington, DC. When I discussed my idea for a book with him he said write it, it will tell a good story. I went home and wrote the first draft. That was in the late fall of 1979. I moved to California a month later and brought the hand-written manuscript with me with the intensions of polishing and rewriting. However, it got pushed back for 35 years.

What do you like most about writing? What do you like least?

Hanging on and following where the characters take me. Some people might say I’m not telling the truth, but my books seem to write themselves. I have a beginning and an idea of an ending and I just start writing. The characters take over and the book comes to life. Sometimes, I am totally amazed that we took the turn in the road we did. Recently, in my new book, one character asked the other where they are going as they climb into the car. I had no idea as I wrote those words. The main character made a choice and the direction they took opened up the plot with a major new twist. I was amazed.

And the least?

I like promoting the book the very least. I wish I could just write and the book would sell itself. That’s not the case. I spend at least fifty percent of my writing time promoting.

Are you working on the next book?

Yes. My work is always based very loosely on something I’ve done or I’ve lived. I just make characters and a story out of it. The first book was based  loosely on my childhood. The new book is based on my first quarter in college in 1965. It’s the story of an 18-year-old freshman who is totally smitten with his single 27-year-old English professor. They become fast friends due to mutual interest and need. Soon, the friendship begins to develop into more. I am obsessed with the story and at the present time have over 52,000 words down.

Tell us how long it took you to write your book.

I wrote the first draft of the first book in three months. I wrote it in longhand because my old typewriter had keys that stuck and I could write faster than type. It was put aside as I said for 35 years. I pulled the old manuscript out and began transcription and rewrite last year. I spent nearly a year on the final book. So, the answer is 37 years in total time and a year and three months of actually writing time.

Whats next for you in writing?

To continue with the new book until it’s ready to send to my publisher. I also plan to pull out some old short stories and see what I can do with them. I spend a tremendous amount of time promoting the book and finding readers.

Thank you for visiting with us today. Can’t wait to hear about your next new book.

 

 

Cindy Sproles-Spirit & Heart

cindy-sproles  Cindy Sproles is  an author and a speaker. On her website,
http://cindysproles.com you will see where Cindy says, “My dream is do nothing more than craft words that speak from the heart.
Tell us about your  book, Spirit & Heart: A Devotional Journey

spirit-and-heart Spirit and Heart, we feel, has been blessed by God. It’s the little devotional that just keeps selling. It has solid writing, and devotions that soothe the heart. We hope when readers glean through this book, they find a certain peace that God is with them, warming their hearts and souls.
This book was a six-month project that included writers from our website, and published authors. It includes scripture verses, space to  journal, for individual prayers and words of wisdom from some of today’s best-selling authors.
Listen to God speak as you read His word and reflect on the stories of others. Write down your thoughts and meditate on each day’s message.

This book is a primer, a tool to get you started on the path toward spending your best moments with the Father. Christ says, where your heart is there your treasure will be. Treasure His words and whispers as you walk in the footsteps of award-winning authors.

The daily devotions included in this book are heartfelt stories, lessons, and advice from others who have traveled the devotional journey.
It was a joy to edit and compile these 30 devotions into work that we continue to sell at conferences and on the internet.
What is your personal writing schedule?
My personal writing schedule varies. But I try to write 1800 words a day. It is a goal I usually reach but sometimes, like everyone, I get pulled away.  God has blessed me to be a part of Christian Devotions. www.christiandevotions.us. Our ministry has not only allowed us to teach writers, but it has honed my personal skills as well.
Tell us about Cindy Sproles.
I’m a mountain gal, born and raised in the Appalachian Mountains where life is simple, words have a deep southern drawl, and colloquialisms like, “well slap my knee and call me corn pone” seem to take precedence over proper speech. Apple Butter, coal mining, the river, pink sunrises and golden sunsets help you settle into a porch swing and relax. Family, the love of God and strong morals are embedded into my life in the mountains. Teaching writers, spinning fiction tales about life in the mountains, history and down home ideas find their way into all I do. I love to write devotions, to seek after the deeper side of Christ and to share the lessons He teaches me from life in the hills of East Tennessee. I am a writer. A speaker. A lover of God’s Word and friend to all.
Thank you for visiting us today Cindy.
Be sure and visit Cindy’s website. http://cindysproles.com

Shelly Frome-A Man of Many Talents

 

shelly frome

Shelly Frome, author of Murder Run, a professor of dramatic arts emeritus at the University of Connecticut, a former professional actor, play write, director, columnist, just to name a few hats he wears. I’m told he has written over twenty-five plays in addition to articles, novels, and non-fiction.

We are so delighted to have him visiting with us today. Thank you Shelly.

It is a pleasure to visit with you Susan.

Murder Run 

Your fiction includes Twilight of the DrifterThe Twinning Murders, and Lilac Moon. His Hollywood crime caper Tinseltown Riff and your latest crime novel Murder Run, which was released in August.

Your non-fiction works are the acclaimed The Actors Studio and texts on The Art and Craft of Screenwriting and writing for the stage. Many people would love to know how to become a screenwriter. What is your book about exactly?

Unlike many handbooks on the subject offering surefire methods that often contradict one another; this book is an attempt to offer a variety of approaches in view of differing aims and sensibilities.  To accomplish this, in addition to my own experiences and understanding, I interviewed a range of insiders. As a result, the introductory chapters cover basic essentials. The second part deals with options, such as engaging in a host of genres, indie films and adaptation.  Part Three is a collection of the revealing interviews I engaged in in Hollywood and elsewhere in order to get deep within the realities.

Well indeed this would be a good book for people to read and study who want to be a screenwriter.

I want to get back to your newest novel, Murder Run. Tell us about it. Murder Run

It’s a crime novel in which I wanted to explore what happens when a rank amateur unwittingly gets caught up in circumstances beyond his or her control. In this case, I picked the most unlikely amateur detective–a wayward handyman who finds himself grappling with the suspicious death of his employer, a fragile choreographer who secluded herself in the Litchfield Hills. As the fallout mounts, more mayhem takes place and leads begin to connect to the handyman’s past, the reader is taken to various locales in and around Manhattan, an escapade in Miami Lakes and back again to the hills of Connecticut until this twisty conundrum is finally laid to rest.

You got a great review from Peter Lefcourt, who won a Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Drama Series.

I was lucky. Peter just happens to hail from the mean streets of New York before he became a fixture in Hollywood. In fact, there’s a full interview with him in my book on screenwriting relating to his background and unique vision. As for my crime novel, he said, “A terrific read, fast and funny, with well-drawn characters and a good deal of ambiance and charm.”

Tell us about your directing.

I directed my original screenplay The Royal Palm Ragamuffin Blues for Time-Warner’s Cable 5. I’ve also directed over sixty college, Community Theater and high school productions and thirteen original dance/theater pieces.  You could say, my days as a New York starving actor, teaching acting and film at The University of Connecticut all those years, and the original plays I’ve written along with my directing experiences have a lot to do with my sense of what makes stories come to life on the page, stage and screen.

You are truly a busy man. We are so delighted you visited with us today. Please come back and keep us posted on your next book release.

Thank you, Susan, I surely will. In the meantime, I’m always happy to receive feedback from my column on screenwriting in Southern Writers Magazine.