Archives

Catherine Ulrich Brakefield~A Hopeless Romantic and Patriot.

katherineCatherine is an ardent receiver of Christ’s rejuvenating love, an award-winning author as well as a hopeless romantic and patriot. She skillfully intertwines these elements into her writing as the author of The Wind of Destiny, an inspirational historical romance, and Images of America, The Lapeer Area. Her most recent history book is Images of America, Eastern Lapeer County. Catherine, was a former staff writer for Michigan Traveler Magazine, and freelanced for numerous publications.

Her short stories have been published in Guidepost Books; Extraordinary Answers to Prayers,Unexpected Answers and Desires of Your Heart; Baker Books, Revell, The Dog Next Door, and The Horse of my Heart; CrossRiver Publishing, The Benefit Package, and Abba’s Promise; and Bethany House, Jesus talked to me Today. 

Catherine enjoys horseback riding, swimming, camping, and traveling the byroads across America. She lives in Michigan with her husband, Edward, of forty years and her Arabian horses. Her children grown and married, she and Edward are the blessed recipients of two handsome grandsons and a lovely granddaughter.

We welcome Catherine to AuthorsVisits today. 

Tell us about your newest book, Destiny’s Whirlwind, which is the second book in your Destiny Series.

destiny6Collina McConnell is thrust from adolescence to adulthood as she promises her dying father she will manage their estate, but her father dies before disclosing the mystery behind his legacy for Shushan. Dashing Rough Rider Franklin Long offers his help, and suddenly Collina’s heart has a will of its own. Does he feel the same for her? War is declared, and he leaves for the Cuban shoreline. He holds the key to her heart, but will he return? A disgruntled in-law and a vindictive lawyer place the McConnell clan in the clutches of life’s tangled web of deception and greed. As Collina fights to keep her promise to her father, the words of Esther 8:6 ring in her thoughts. “How can I endure to see the evil that will come to my people?”

This is the second part of a four-part series, right?

Yes.

In Destiny’s Whirlwind the events within the novel, which is a historical romance, take place just before the Spanish-American war and span through 1898.

swept into destiny 2The struggles which the McConnell family faces throughout the Destiny series mirror the struggles and perseverance which have been shown by past generations of American leaders, like former U.S. President Theodore Roosevelt.

History, and historical romances, are really about the past shaping our future. I think that is what my Destiny series portrays.

The series begins in the Antebellum era in the 1850s and it’s going to carry us all the way through . . . after World War II. It shows us that each generation peppers (its) wisdom upon the next generation. The people who lived in the past, they helped (transform) this nation into what it’s become. Those American leaders throughout our history (demonstrate) courage and wisdom … It really shows us how we survived, despite all odds.wilted dandeliions

I read an article that Elise Shire of The Oxford leader wrote about you. In it you said “I hope my novel, Destiny’s Whirlwind, a faith-based fiction will help inspire readers to face life’s challenges with similar fortitude. We’re sinners, but we’re willing to repent. Life may knock us down but, like the McConnells, we never quit. Our nation was founded by Christians. As long as we keep praying, God’s going to keep helping us through our ordeals.”

We thank you for visiting with us today, and we are looking forward to your next release in your Destiny’s series.  Please keep us posted.

Visit Catherine on her website and blog:

https://www.catherineulrichbrakefield.com/

https://catherineulrichbrakefield.wordpress.com/

https://www.facebook.com/CatherineUlrichBrakefield

https://twitter.com/CUBrakefield

Advertisements

Leslie Hachtel~Invites You In

 

leslie hachtelLeslie Hachtel was born in Hamilton, Ohio and has lived all over the United States. She started writing years ago when she simply decided to sit down at a typewriter and she was transported to another world. She realized then a writer writes because there is no other choice.

Her genres include historical, contemporary, romantic suspense and historical/paranormal since she loves them all.

Leslie lives in Memphis, Tennessee with her fabulously supportive husband, Bob. And of course, with Jakita, the terrier.

Welcome to Authors Visits Leslie. We are delighted to have you visit.

Tell us something you would like your readers to know about you they don’t.

I have an awesome bucket list and I am working on it. For example, I wanted to feed a giraffe and I did that last weekend. It was amazing. I am taking ballroom dancing lessons and I challenged myself by doing “Go Ape” where you zip line and face challenges high in the trees.

Wow. I was not expecting that. Tell us about your traveling. What is the most unusual place you’ve ever visited and did you put something about it in one of your books?

I have traveled extensively around America (and lived in many states) and I have been to Europe and the Caribbean. I think I would consider all of those places unusual since there are so many cultural differences. Each location has so much to recommend it. And some have ended up in my books. “Payback” is set in Michigan, “Texas Summer” in a small town in Texas. But I suppose my favorite location remains in England – hundreds of years ago – and I sometimes wish I could actually time travel.

payback                         texas summer

In a prior life, what did you do before becoming a writer?

Over the years, I had a variety of jobs. And I do mean a variety. I have owned a catering service for NBC in Los Angeles, taught horseback riding to the disabled, spent time in advertising as a media buyer, and most recently, I was a licensed veterinary technician for 18 years.

Do you still do that, if not how difficult was the decision to give it up? If you still do it, how do you balance that with writing?

There are definitely things I miss about working in veterinary medicine. Which is why I just decided to volunteer a few hours a week at the Memphis Zoo.  But, choosing full-time writing was a decision I have not regretted.

Does coincidence sometimes play a role in your books? If so is there a particular example you can share?

If coincidence defined as being in the right place at the right time, then many of my books play a role in that. In “The Dream Dancer”, Lady Bryce was in the marketplace at the same time as Rowland. In “Hannah’s War”, Hannah happened to stumble onto Lucas’s doorstep. In “The Defiant Bride”, Dariana was in the woods right where William was injured.

dream dancer hannahs war  the definant bride

Your favorite Hobby? Does it by chance have any impact/influence on your writing?

When I’m not writing, I love to sew, make jewelry and paint (in acrylics). I also love to cook. And yes, some of my characters share the same hobbies. once upon a tableclothLily in “Once Upon a Tablecloth” is a painter, as is Kennedy in “Texas Summer”.  Marilee, In “Captain’s Captive” is a great cook.captive cative

 

Are your books research intensive? What’s the scariest
research you’ve ever done?

Yes. Very. I hate when I read a book and there is some glaring flaw in the facts or the history. So, I endeavor to make sure my books are accurate. The most frightening research was for “Hannah’s War”. It’s set in the Civil War and there are many history buffs out there who are well-versed in the facts of that war. I did not want to make a mistake. Also, in “A Dance in Time”, many books have been written about the sinking of “The Mary Rose”. (I know, since I think I read most of them). Again, I had to make sure I was as accurate as possible.

Name a few fun facts you learned while researching some of your books.

In “Hannah’s War”, I learned about Smokey Row and the fact that prostitution was virtually legalized in Nashville during the Civil War.

What are you working on now that you can share with us?

I just started working on Book 2 of the “Morocco” series and I recently signed a contract to be part of an anthology entitled “Perfectly Poisoned” set in the 1800’s. I am very excited about both of these projects.

Tell us how your newest book came about; the Story behind it so to speak.

Oddly enough, “Bound to Morocco” came about during a fun excursion to Escapology. That is one of those places where you are ‘locked’ in and have a time limit to escape. Great fun. Anyway, the scenario was we were ‘shanghaied’ on a ship and had to solve puzzles and get out before ‘it sailed’. And I thought, what if …

What was the easiest part of writing it and what was the most difficult.

The easiest part of writing is the actual writing part. I become totally immersed and time just flies. The hardest part is keeping up with the business part, like marketing.

Which is the easiest for you? Writing dialogue, creating characters, plots, and or scenes?

Once I sit down and start to tell a story, it seems to be pretty easy. Until I go back and have to edit. That’s the hard part. I have to be objective, with a reader’s point of view, and it’s not easy.

What advice would you give to writers?

Just two words: Don’t quit! If you are a writer, you write. And you cannot let negative feedback discourage you. That is not the same as constructive criticism. Believe in yourself, believe in your work and Don’t Quit!

Share a fun Fact with us.

I think my dog would take credit for the books I write if she could talk. But, I have to say, it is nice to have her in my office as I work.

Thank you so much for visiting with us. We enjoyed hearing about your life as a writer and more about your books.

Be sure and visit Leslie Hachtel at https://www.lesliehachtel.com/

https://www.facebook.com/leslie.hachtel

Jan McCanless~Beryl’s Cove Mysteries

pub-pic-3X5 (4)

Jan McCanless is a retired school teacher and noted premier Southern Humorist. Her homespun articles appear in six national magazines, and her regular newspaper columns. Her delightful Beryl’s Cove mystery series is a cross between Mayberry RFD and Murder She Wrote, and she has two compilations of her humor articles out as well. Once you’ve read one of her books, you are hooked and become a Jan McCanless fan for life! 

Welcome Jan. We are thrilled to have you visit us today.

Tell us something you would like your readers to know about you they don’t.

I am an absolute fanatic about crossword puzzles, and am usually seen working on one anytime I am not writing.  Spouse claims I am the world’s best cook, and  I am an ordained Lay Minister of the Lutheran Church – a fact I am very proud of.

Wow, I did not know that.

I understand you traveled to a most unusual place. Where was this and did it wind up in one of your books?

Quite honestly, the most unusual place was a wax museum in New Orleans. It was dedicated to the macabre, and had some really unusual things in it. Scenes from Dracula, that sort of thing.  No, it never made it into one of my books.

Most of my columns are autobiographical in nature, so things of this nature find themselves in my stories.  Interesting thing about this adventure was the sign on each exhibit, telling the visitor to keep their hands down, so as not to sound an alarm. Naturally, I had to point and gesture, setting off every alarm in the whole place, at each exhibit. Spouse says I embarrassed him tremendously, but, isn’t that what I’m supposed to do with my columns?

In a previous life, what did you do before becoming a writer?

Most all my readers know I was a school teacher, but, a lot of them are surprised to learn I was once a registered Medical Technologist.  I was an assistant to a pathologist, and we of course, did forensic work, autopsies, tissue examination, that sort of thing. I’ve always been fascinated by forensics, probably why I write murder mysteries. I loved the work.  Retirement brought me to the job of volunteer tour guide for our local senior center, a very rewarding job, and I absolutely loved it.jan

If you’ve retired, how difficult was it to give it up?

My first day of not teaching was hard, I got up early, got dressed and was going out the door to school, when it occurred to me I was no longer employed there. I’d still be teaching if not for arthritis, which made it extremely difficult to walk the concrete floors and carry AV equipment, etc .  To this day, I miss my students, many of whom have remained friends over the years, and I miss the mental stimulation.  Realistically, I knew I could not give it my all, so, yes, I miss it.

Does coincidence sometimes play a role in your books? If so, is there a particular example you can share. 

Not as much as one would think,  since my books are pure fiction. My two compilations of columns  did have a coincidence. I had just submitted a column about my time up in Fish Creek , Wisconsin, visiting my brother. Spouse and I were taking a day trip up to the mountains, when I ran into a gentleman who was visiting North Carolina from Fish Creek, Wisconsin. My column ran that very week, so, I was quite surprised at the coincidence, and the gentleman and I had a nice, long chat. He loved visiting here he said, and I loved visiting there.  What I find so amusing is, someone at a book signing will invariably tell me they have been to Beryls Cove, NC, an entirely fictional place, yet, they will insist they have been there and loved it. Fans, you gotta love em !  back_to_b_cove

What is your favorite Hobby? Does it by chance have any influence on your writing?

Without question, its reading. I love to read, and  between May and July of this year, I read 14 books. I read constantly, when I’m not writing, and could not live without my books. I have a personal library in my home with over 300 volumes of books I want to keep and maybe read again some day. Other books go to consignment, there simply is not room enough for them.

Does reading influence my writing? Absolutely, I love to study characters and interesting, exciting plots will really hold my interest. I try to learn from other successful authors too, and have garnered many ideas from them over the years. You have to tell yourself  that they are successful  for a reason.  I try to take something away from all of them, and writing well is a constant learning process.

Do you have to do much research in your writing?

Writing a good story takes research, no matter what the subject. Even fiction has to be accurate if you are quoting facts, so, I actually enjoy research. I have a research assistant  when needed, and have found out many things about Las Vegas, for instance, and the book I’m writing now takes place in England. So, I am thoroughly enjoying researching places near my fictional town. Over the years, I have made a few mistakes in my facts, so, I quickly learned that to be accurate, I must research. It’s time-consuming, but, worth the effort. For the book I am doing now, I did about 3 months worth of research before I wrote the first word.

What are yo working on now?

It’s the third book in my Brother Jerome series, which is an offshoot of the Beryls Cove mysteries. I made the HUGE mistake of saying in my last book, there would be no more, and fans and publisher alike jumped all over me, wanting more, more, more. So, This book is entitled The Opera House Murders, and is about this lovely old home that is now a residence for elderly, retired entertainers in the small English village of Colliers Dog.  I have lovely, elderly British people, retired from show business, but, still entertaining themselves, and wonderful  English customs and sayings to employ.  My maternal grandmother was born in England,and I used to adore her way of speaking, and am absolutely fascinated by British mysteries, so, thought I would write one myself. I am really enjoying it,and having great fun with my characters,and especially Brother Jerome, a true misfit if there ever was one.  Hopefully, it will be out next winter.

Tell us how your newest book came about, the story behind it.

Well, as I said, I love the English mysteries, but, to tell you the truth, in my last book,  Gold, Frankincense and Mrrrdur , I had an English  character, and he was very popular with my readers. I loved the way his part in the plot was revealed, and enjoyed writing about him, so, I thought, why not?murder jan

What is the easiest for you? Writing dialogue, creating characters, plot or scenes?

For me, the easiest is the plot, it’s usually fomenting in my brain for quite some time before I sit down to write. In fact, it  generally keeps me awake at night,and when I can’t stand it any longer, I sit down and write.  Plots , for me, are easy, they just simply pop into my head.  Hardest is writing dialogue. For one thing, I was an English teacher, and proper grammar is important to me, but, most people don’t speak a formal English with a lot of correct grammar. I have to remember that when I write. A construction worker, for instance, is not going to tell you he is headed to the restaurant and going to buy a cup of coffee. No, he will say he’s goin to the diner to get a cuppa coffee, or joe.  Most folks are turned off by overly formal language and all the proper grammar a writer can throw at them, they are intimidated, so, I try always to write as the average person speaks.  In my early books, I have octogenarian twins, one repeated everything the other one said. Oh man, that was hard, because I was writing everything twice. It made their characterizations quite endearing though, but, it was a long, slow process.

What advice would you give to other writers?

I would tell them three things.  Stay the course, don’t be put off by rejection or two, we all get them or have gotten them.  If you believe in your work, then, eventually, someone else will, and you’ll be on your way. I self published my first book, because all the rejects I got told me there was not enough sex, violence or profanity in it. I don’t write books like that, and I believed in my work. One publisher told me I’d never get anywhere with it, but, I published it anyway, and it was out one week, and went best seller. the rest, as they say, is history. Now, my publisher asks me when he can receive the next book.

Network as much as you can with other authors.  Writing is a learning experience, and talk to other authors as much as you can, and you will find out a lot of good information.  Southern Writers Magazine is a marvelous resource for this, and eventually, you’ll hit upon your own voice and style of writing.  I work at least 2 book festivals a year, in other parts of the country, and I learn from every one of them. I see many author friends, and we get together and brain storm. you’d be surprised the good ideas you can pick up from another writer.  We swap books often,and you can really learn from all this.

Write what you know. If you are into romance, don’t try to write science fiction. Write what you know, and familiarize yourself with your audience. I had the advantage of writing newspaper columns for the middle ager, that’s what I know, so, my characters are almost all middle-aged or older, with few exceptions,  because I know and understand how the middle years affect people.  I could not nor would not attempt to write a book about teenagers, too far removed from them ,despite having 6 teenaged grandchildren, I am not with them 24/7 to see all their activities, or understand their language and music today.  My favorite genre of book is murder mysteries, Agatha Christie being my fave author, so, that is what I write. Murder mysteries, always with a twist, and always family friendly stories.

Tell me a fun fact about you.

I am an incorrigible practical joker, and I could not live without humor. I tried being serious once, it didn’t work for me.   Humor is  a big part of my public speaking, and I am a very frustrated pop singer.  Don’t tell anyone though.

It has been an honor having Jan McCanless with us today. Check out her sites and get her books if you want great reads.

 

janmacbooks.com

http://authors.southernwritersmagazine.com/jan-mccanless.html

 

 

 

Bruce A. Stewart ~ Writer of Southern Fiction

bruce stewart Growing up in the colorful, multicultural, state of Louisiana, Bruce was reared with an appreciation for diversity and a love for small-town life. After high school and a couple of years of college, he began his twenty-eight-year career as a Louisiana State Police trooper, retiring as a sergeant in 2009. During that time, he witnessed the humorous, the sad, the tragic, and even the unimaginablre. These life experiences give him tremendous credibility when writing about the many aspects of the human condition.

Welcome to Authors Visits.  We have Bruce A Stewart visiting us today. Bruce is the author of Hurt Road which just released in March of this year.

Bruce, tell us something you would like your readers to know about you they don’t.

I am a music lover. Everything from bluegrass to rock and roll. I like some of it all. Or is it all of it some. Anyway. Many times, when writing a tense scene, I’ll put on the soundtrack from The Last Samurai. A piece of music I absolutely love. Hauntingly beautiful and inspiring.

In your travels what is the most unusual place you’ve ever visited and did you put something about it in one of your books?

I’ve had the opportunity to visit some unique places but, as far as my writing goes, I stick with the one I know best. My home state of Louisiana.

In a prior life, what did you do before becoming a writer?

In my prior life, I was a Louisiana state trooper for almost thirty years.

Do you still do that, if not how difficult was the decision to give it up? If you still do it, how do you balance that with writing?

When I retired from the state police, I knew it was time. Then, I started to write. Or try to, anyway. It didn’t take me long to figure out I didn’t know what I was doing. And, I’m still a work in progress. I have a part-time job now but write as much as I can each day.

Does coincidence sometimes play a role in your books? If so is there a particular example you can share?

As a police officer, I had the opportunity to witness quite a few things over the years. Some good, some bad. Some of these have worked their way into my writing. Of course, the names have been changed to protect the innocent. And, in a lot of cases, the guilty.

Favorite Hobby? Does it by chance have any impact/influence on your writing?

My favorite hobby is crappie fishing. The past few years, though, my writing has taken priority. I manage to squeeze in a fishing scene from time to time.

While writing, do you snack? If so, do you prefer sweet or salty snacks?

I tend to snack on copious amounts of coffee.

What are you working on now that you can share with us?

Right now, I am wrapping up a three-book series about a small town, Louisiana sheriff.

Tell us how your newest book came about; the Story behind it so to speak.

When I was twelve, two young Marines from our small community were killed in Vietnam. Five days apart. One was our next-door neighbor’s son. So, I’ve always had a soft spot in my heart for Vietnam veterans. My latest book, Hurt Road, is about Hank Goodman, a young man from Michigan. When Hank’s mom and dad are killed, he must HurtRoad_1850move in with his grandparents in Louisiana. But after getting settled, situations change and take him away for five years. After a couple of tours in Vietnam, Hank returns to Louisiana to find a lot of things have changed. Many of them, not for the better. When Hank takes a job as a deputy sheriff, he must try to stop a killer while battling demons of his own.

What was the easiest part of writing it and what was the most difficult.

The book starts in 1967 and ends in 1972. My coming of age years. So, it’s a time period I’m very familiar with. And setting it in Louisiana, I drew a lot from personal experience. Writing about someone suffering the effects of war, coming home and trying to adjust, had to be the hardest part.

Which is the easiest for you? Writing dialogue, creating characters, plots, and or scenes?

I personally think I have a knack for creating interesting personalities. I’ve gotten quite a few complimentary reviews from readers who say they really connect with my characters. As far as writing scenes, I can make myself laugh and I can make myself cry. I hope my words have the same effect on readers.

What advice would you give to writers?

Keep writing. And read. Reading will make you a better writer. And never, ever give up. If you get rejected or someone writes a negative review, don’t let it get you down. Those things are going to happen. I have an assignment for you. Pull up the most popular book in the country right now and see if it doesn’t have a ton of one-star reviews. What? The book so many people love, some absolutely hate? That’s right. Because not everyone likes the same thing. The story one publisher passes on, another may love. Just remember, only you can write your story. Write it well and then get it out there.

A ‘fun fact’ for your readers.

To date, I have completed six novels and my grandfather, Alex Stewart, makes a cameo appearance in each one. He’s been everything, from a dentist to a car salesman. Just a little shout-out to a man I thought the world of. A big-hearted guy with a love for life and a great sense of humor.

Thank you Bruce for visiting us today. We’ve enjoyed getting to know more about you the person and the author.  

Congratulations on your new book. Excellent book.  Let us know when your next book releases. I know your fans don’t want to miss that one.

Be sure and visit Bruce at: http://www.bruceastewart.com/

https://twitter.com/authorbastewart?lang=en

https://www.facebook.com/authorbruceastewart/

And don’t forget to visit www.southernwritersmagazine.com

See our new Summer Reading Catalog: https://joom.ag/yoEYSummer Reads

 

 

Larissa Reinhart~Southern Author

larissa reinhart321

If you’re looking for stories about strong, sassy heroines who tend to find trouble without even trying, then you want to read Larissa Reinhart’s books.

Welcome to Author’s Visits. Today Larissa Reinhart is visiting.

Larissa, A Wall Street Journal bestselling author and 2015 Georgia Author of the Year Best Mystery finalist. She writes the Cherry Tucker Mystery and Maizie Albright Star Detective series and the Finley Goodhart Crime Caper series, and various romantic comedies. She loves books, food, and traveling with her family. 

I’ve been waiting to find out about your new book that just released, View to a Chill.

Cherry Tucker suffers from flu-induced visions of murder, while Maizie Albright’s on the hunt for a missing granddaughter whose criminal stockings have long been filled with coal.view to a chill

Wow, Have Cherry and Maizie in the same book is going to be fantastic. I really can’t wait to get it.

I understand they are making movies in your part of the country.

I live in Peachtree City, Georgia (when I’m not in Japan) and the TV and movie industry has exploded here. Georgia is now the number one state to make movies, surpassing California and New York. About four years ago, the huge UK film company, Pinewood Studios, built their America studios a few miles from my house. Acres and acres of giant soundstages and the like. Now big blockbuster movies, like all the recent Marvel movies, are filmed here. About five miles away in the other direction, is the little town of Senoia and that’s where The Walking Dead films. AMC just bought the studio TWD uses, so I’m sure more AMC television shows will be here. Sony Pictures bought property nearby, too. We started with Fried Green Tomatoes in Senoia back in 1991, and the movie people have been coming here ever since.

I take that back. Actually, Smokey and the Bandit filmed around here back in 1977. We just celebrated the 40th anniversary this summer.

The film industry in a place like small-town Georgia is a such a great setting. Lots of interesting paradoxes. Plus big money means more interesting crime, which is good for mysteries.

Tell us about your book,16 MINUTES, the book in your Maizie Albright Star Detective series.

You know Susan, I have so much fun with these books.

16 minutes

I had this character, Maizie Albright. She’s about 180 degrees different from my redneck artist character, Cherry Tucker. Maizie was raised in California in the movie industry. A child star with an extremely driven stage-mother. Maizie’s daddy remained in Georgia — she’s a child of divorce — and I get my redneck element with him and his family. But he’s the CEO of DeerNose Corp, clothing and accessories scented with deer pee. A corporate redneck. He’s famous in his own right, on the cover of every (fictional) hunting and gaming magazine you can think of. So two driven parents and this young woman who’s spent much of her youth living someone else’s dream. The happiest point in her childhood was starring in this TV show as a teen detective. So after crashing and burning in Hollywood, she returns to Georgia (on judge’s orders) to pursue her own dream: becoming a real-life detective.

In 16 MILLIMETERS,  she’s continuing her career-makeover quest as a for-real detective. Wyatt Nash has Maizie working in the office —where the clients are few and far between — while he’s doing the few-and-far-between security solutions. Maizie’s a little bored and a lot frustrated (both career-wise and romantically). When a major movie producer needs a babysitter for his hot mess starlet, Maizie eagerly takes the job. Nash is not happy with the decision. And when her starlet appears dead and then not dead, Maizie scrambles to watch an actress who seems determined to screw up her career plus find this missing corpse. And she keeps finding more bodies. Maizie’s hunting a killer who may be a celebrity stalker. And Maizie might be the next celebrity who gets snuffed.

Was your book research intensive? Did you find some fun facts?

Research is a delicate balance while writing for me because I’ll get sucked into the internet looking for a fact for one sentence. My family was on HGTV’s House Hunters International while we were in Japan (our episode’s called “Living for the Weekend in Nagoya, Japan”) and that’s helped me with some background in how reality shows can be filmed.

Did you find a not so fun fact while researching your book?

I was shocked (ha) at the number of actors who underwent shock treatment, particularly in the 1940s. There’s such a strong correlation between mental illness and artists. I deal with it lightly in the series, mainly in Maizie’s remarks about the stars she’s met in rehab, but I  try to deal with it respectfully. There’s a chicken and the egg syndrome between fame and depression. They feed each which I find poignant.

What do you like most about writing? What do you like least?

I love creating story ideas. They’re always popping in my head, which makes it hard to concentrate on the book I’m currently writing. I love the premise of an idea, new characters; when a book feels like it’s writing itself. I sometimes find myself surprised by what happens after I write it. That’s such an exciting tingly feeling.

The readers are the best part of writing, though. When I get an email from a reader who’s been going through a difficult time — an illness, a death, job loss, etc. — and they tell me my books have helped them escape that for a little while…it makes me cry every time. I get so much personal fulfillment in knowing I helped them in this very insignificant way. I’ve been there. Books are my escape, too.

Tell us something fun you like to do.

Now that we’re not traveling around Japan, we spend a lot of weekends seeking out BBQ in Georgia. My husband smokes pulled pork as a serious hobby. We’re huge BBQ fanatics, so we take a lot of pleasure in finding local spots for BBQ.

We are so delighted you visited with us today. Love reading your books, they always give me a much-needed break from my everyday world.  Keep up the writing!

Start looking for her next book, The Cupid Caper

Be sure and visit Larissa at https://www.larissareinhart.com/

https://www.facebook.com/larissareinhartwriter

 

Richard L. Mabry-Medical Suspense With Heart.

richard mabry new  I want to welcome Dr. Richard Mabry today. We are very honored to have him visit. In addition to practicing medicine, you will find his past as interesting as his novels. He was in the US Air Force overseas, several periods as an interim music minister and as he says, “An all-too-brief experience as a semi-pro baseball player.” 

As a physician he has had lots of opportunities to write through his time as a doctor. 

“During the 36 years I spent in medicine, I wrote or edited eight textbooks, authored over a hundred professional papers, and an invited guest speaker all over the world.”

You also held the presidency or vice-presidency of three professional societies,  received a number of awards and honors.

“Yes, but if you asked my greatest reward in medicine, it would be in seeing patients get better under my care.”

Before I ask you about your newest book, I would like to talk a little bit about your first non-medical book you wrote. The Tender Scar: Life After The Death Of A Spouse.tender scar

I wrote that book after after the death of my first wife. The book offers hope and healing for the brokenhearted. It addresses the heart-wrenching pain of losing a spouse. Working from my journal entries written after the death of my wife, I use my journey as a stepping-stone to a practical discussion of the grief process. The second edition of this book includes a new chapter that highlights the process of building a second marriage and blended family after loss. I’m gratified that it continues to help those who have lost a loved one.

No wonder it is still selling today. 

Tell me about your newest release, Surgeons Choice.

SurgeonsChoice

Dr. Ben Merrick and his fiancé, Rachel Gardner, can’t get her divorced parents to stay in the same room, much less attend their wedding together.  He is also looking over his shoulder expecting more trouble from a very senior surgeon who has shown he is still smarting from a previous dust-up. Ben doesn’t know if a series of mishaps and accidents are caused by a disgruntled patient’s relatives or represent more from the older surgeon.

Then his prospective father-in-law approaches him, needing money for reasons Ben can’t fathom. Rachel has an idea about the cause of the request, but she doesn’t want to accept it. Then, when the deaths begin, Ben and Rachel begin to wonder if they can escape unscathed…and alive.

Can’t wait to read this one Richard. Everything I’ve read backs up your words “I write what I call medical suspense with heart”.

Your novels have been finalists for the ACFW Carol Award, Romantic Times’ Best Inspirational Novel and their Reviewer’s Choice Award; won the Selah award, and been named by Christian Retailing as the best in the mystery/suspense/thriller category.
I have to bring up your book Silent Night, Deadly Night; it’s a page turner. Great job. I really like the cover! Please share a little of this book with our readers.
The colored lights on the snow give it a holiday appearance, but the dead woman’s body in the yard add’s a grisly touch. Everyone wants to know how  Ina Bell Patrick died?
Who killed her? And why?silent nitghtThe dead woman had no direct heirs, so two nephews and a niece stood to inherit. Dr. Laura Morris was left to make all the arrangements, attorney Roger Morris could certainly use the money, and Zack Morris had disappeared two years earlier. Then there was a neighbor and “best friend” Fay Autrey, who was certain the woman intended to leave her some money—a great deal of money.The police were still looking for the killer who left the frozen body in the snow when it became apparent someone was trying to pick off the heirs, one by one. You begin to wonder who is going to win win the race—the police or the killer?

If readers haven’t read it, they need to get it now. They want want to put it down either.
Thank you Richard for joining us today. Look forward to reading your newest book, Surgeons Choice.
You can follow Richard L. Mabry, M.D. on his blog (rmabry.blogspot.com) and his web page (rmabry.com), as well as Facebook (rmabrybooks) and Twitter (RichardMabry).

 

Tom Conner ––Promoting Movie Classics

tom conner photo

Thomas Conner, also known as Tom or Tommy; but if you are family and friends you can call him TC.

Born in Florida two miles from the Alabama state line. He spent most of his early years living on the Alabama side.  Conner wrote his first novel when he was 12 (which burned in a house fire) and has been writing ever since.  He’s published a family history book, several articles. and his newest book,  Goodbye, Saturday Night.tom connwe vook

TC (I consider myself a friend) resides in Central California’s Big Valley, where he has worked in higher education at a prestigious private university in Student Life. When not writing or working his daytime job, he is involved with classic movies. He serves on a classic cinema committee and promotes summer classic movie series.

Tell us about this book.

It’s early May in 1956 in the small South Alabama town of Farmington, and eleven year old Bobby Crosby’s life is about to change forever. He’s still anguishing over the death of his father even though it’s been five years, and he’s come to despise the life centered around his mother’s cafe, a place that turns into the revelrous hot spot of the community when the sun goes down. Bobby escapes his real world by sitting every night in the local movie theater, third row left down front. There, alone in the dark, he leaves Farmington far behind and melts into the world of the silver screen. Bobby’s best friend is Hucker Nolan, a twenty-two year old drop-out from the swamps across the tracks who drives a taxicab in the daytime and works concession at the movie theater at night. Now, Bobby’s world seems to be collapsing and there’s nothing he can do to stop it; his mother has a boyfriend Bobby desperately resents and his feelings for Hucker are confusing and ever-changing, often filled with anger and jealousy Bobby doesn’t understand. Then, the worst thing possible happens to Bobby— he’s betrayed by the person he trusts the most.

I think a lot of people can relate to the feelings Bobby has about his situation, his friend, his mother, the loss of a father. I like how you included the movie theater. Most kids my age remember the movies. Of course we didn’t go every night, but we were always there on Saturdays for the matinée. Wouldn’t miss it. Sitting there, you just lost track of you and were drawn into another world. 

Thank you for bringing back the memories of the movie theater!