Archive | July 2017

rick barry  If you haven’t met Rick Barry, then you definitely need to. He’s authored three novels: Gunner’s Run, Kiriath’s Quest, and most recently The Methuselah Project. In addition, he has hundreds of published articles and short stories to his credit.

But that’s not all, Rick speaks Russian, and served in the home offices of two ministries aimed at the former USSR. preaching

By God’s grace, I have visited Eastern Europe over 50 times and worked in Christian camps for children and teens.

His experiences have included skydiving, mountain climbing, rappelling, camping in Russia, kayaking, wilderness hiking, white-water rafting, visiting World War II battlegrounds, even prowling deserted apartments in the evacuated Chernobyl district of Ukraine. He believes that all experiences in life provide fuel for a writer’s imagination. And, he has also served multi-terms as president of American Christian Fiction Writers (ACFW) – Indiana Chapter.

In your newest book, The Methuselah Project, was your book research intensive? Did you find some fun facts?

rick barry book

Definitely. In my experience, writing a novel set at any point in past history requires research, especially if the time period is World War II, which continues to interest the public widely. If your details are inaccurate, there are amateur historians who will shoot you down. As bad as that feels for the author, I believe it hurts worse for the reader, who can no longer enjoy the story knowing that the author hasn’t done the homework and doesn’t really know what he or she is talking about. Fun facts that I learned might bore others, but they include flight characteristics of a P-47 fighter plane and historical details concerning Plainfield, Indiana, the childhood home of my hero.

Did you find not so fun facts while researching your book?

The premise for The Methuselah Project involves a hush-hush German experiment that used Allied prisoners as guinea pigs. Although the actual experiment in my novel is fictitious, Nazi scientists truly did experiment on captives, particularly Jews in the concentration camps. Reading accounts of those experiments qualifies as “not so fun.” The experiment in my own story is much less gruesome.

Does coincidence play a role in your book? If so, what was strangest coincidence you experienced and did you use it in your book?

I’m not a big fan of coincidences in fiction, although some authors and scriptwriters lean heavily on coincidence. (For example, the first Star Wars movie. I mean, really? Princess Leia hides blueprints of the Death Star in an android, which “just happens” to end up in the possession of–of all people in the galaxy–her biological brother, whom she has never met or heard of? That’s a biggie. But fans swallowed it.) The closest thing to a coincidence in my book is the fact that Captain Roger Greene ends up in Atlanta, Georgia, where he meets the main female character, Katherine. But because they are not related in any way, and because the shadowy “organization” manipulates Katherine into keeping tabs on Roger, I don’t see this as coincidence. The organization simply used her proximity to give her a mission. If Captain Greene had been in New York, they might have put another member on his tail.

What is the story behind the creation of your book?

Since I grew up in the home of a pilot, I’ve had a lifelong interest in aviation. Also, WW II has interested me since 7th grade. A third spark for this tale is my interest in a well-told story about time travel. These three elements combined in my imagination. Even though Captain Greene doesn’t literally travel in time, he does end up looking young and still athletic many decades after the war, but with a biologically reasonable explanation that satisfies readers who don’t like sci-fi.

What do you like most about writing? What do you like least?

There’s a special literary adrenaline that feels great when the words and inspiration fuse to produce a hot stream of words flowing from my imagination to my fingers and then onto the computer screen. It’s a wonderfully satisfying experience. The least enjoyable? When I’m stuck in the Sahara Desert of imagination. My trail has led me thus far, and I know of another point in the journey I must reach, but am not sure how to get from this dry valley to that point in a way that will intrigue the reader to stick with me.

Are you working on the next book?

Yes, although with frequent delays as I (too often!) must set aside that project in order to freelance edit, or write an article, or translate something from Russian to English to keep money coming in to pay the bills.

Tell us how long it took you to write your book.

About a year. I wrote it in spurts–a half hour or so in the early morning. Fifteen or twenty minutes during my lunch break. Sometimes an hour in the evening. It’s frustrating to close the Microsoft program when you know exactly what the next line will be, but that’s the life of a part-time writer. Anyone who assumes authors are specially entitled people with huge blocks of spare time for writing is kidding himself. To get started as a writer, you must carve writing time out of your day, protecting and using minutes other people will fritter away with Facebook or Solitaire or TV.

What’s next for you in writing?

Many readers have wished for a sequel to The Methuselah Project. I plan to answer that wish.

Well, please keep us updated and let us know the release date. Thank you for visiting with us today. We have enjoyed learning more about Rick Barry.

Please be sure and check out Rick’s website and social medias.

http://rickcbarry.com/

facebook.com/AuthorRickBarry, or on Twitter (@WriterRickBarry)

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MaryAnn Diorio ~ Lady of Grace!

mary ann

We are delighted to have Dr. MaryAnn Diorio, a widely published, award-winning author of compelling fiction dealing with the deepest issues of the human heart visit us today. She also writes picture books for children. She just released Dandelion Patch.dandilion patch

The topic of the book is Eminent Domain and is written for children primarily between the ages of 3 and 8. Parents can read it to their younger children. Older children can read it themselves.

Can you give us a description?

When Yolanda Riggins discovers that the government plans to build a new highway through her beloved dandelion patch, she rises up in protest and asserts her God-given right to private ownership of property. Will she succeed against all odds to save her dandelion patch? Will tact, truth, and tough love win the day for Yolanda and the children who love her? Read this delightful book to find out.

Her latest fiction release is A Sicilian Farewell, Book 2 in The Italian Chronicles TrilogySicilian

Book 1, The Madonna of Pisano,

madonnawas published in 2015.

When is Book 3 due out?

Book 3, Return to Bella Terra, is scheduled for release in December 2017.

Your non-fiction has appeared in over 100 national magazines, newspapers, and journals, including The Saturday Evening Post, Billy Graham’s Decision Magazine, The Press of Atlantic City, and Human Events. She strives to base her writing on Scriptural truth and Biblical principles.

MaryAnn, I understand you love to help people.

Yes,  I  love to help people discover their God-given purpose in life so I maintain a life coaching practice with a special emphasis on coaching writers.

What do you do when you aren’t writing?

When not writing, I love to spend time with my family. I enjoy reading, painting, playing the piano and cello, and especially making up silly songs with my five rambunctious grandchildren.  My husband Dom and I have been married for 47 years. We reside in New Jersey and enjoy spending time together at the beach.

Tell us about your newest book.

A Sicilian Farewell
A young man, a new land, and a dream that threatens to destroy him, his marriage, and his family . . .

It was released in 2016 as Book 2 of The Italian Chronicles Trilogy. In this story, we continue to follow the adventures of Maria Landro Tonetta and her husband Luca as they embark from Sicily to America. The story takes place at the end of the 19th century.

Where did the idea come from?

The idea for this story came from my family history, particularly from the life of my paternal great-great-grandmother.  This book is a sequel to Book 1, The Madonna of Pisano, in which I lay the groundwork for the two subsequent books of the trilogy.

How long did it take to write?

The story took approximately 10 months to write.

What is the most fun for you in writing?

Without question, the most fun for me is the creative aspect of writing. When I write, I feel most like the Creator in Whose image I have been made. Also, because I know that God has called me to write for Him, I feel as though I please Him when I write.

I begin every writing project and every writing session by praying for the Holy Spirit to guide me. I proclaim His promise in Proverbs 16: 3 AMP: Commit your work to the Lord, and your plans will be established. When I get to a point in my writing where I don’t know which direction to take, I pray again, and the Holy Spirit always comes through for me.

What is not the fun part for you?

Without question the business and marketing part of writing. I would much rather be writing than marketing my books or doing the necessary bookkeeping involved with a writing business.

What is a regular day like for you when you are writing?

I write five days a week—often six—from 9:00 am until 1:00 pm—or until I finish my daily word count goal of 1000 words. I begin my day quite early—usually around 5:00 am—in order to spend time with the Lord. I find this absolutely essential and won’t write or do anything else (except have a cup of coffee J) until I have spent time with God.  I begin by worshiping Him. I usually put on peaceful praise and worship music and begin praising God. I receive His wisdom and guidance for the day. After about 30-45 minutes of worshiping God and praying in the spirit, I then read and study the Bible. I like to do this verse by verse, asking the Holy Spirit to teach me what I need to learn from that particular passage. After about an hour of Bible study, I pray for the needs of my family, my friends, and for others. I also pray for myself.

After studying my Bible, I read a portion of a book on growing in Christ. I love to read the classics of Christian literature, such as the works of Jeanne Guyon. At this point, it is usually about 8:00 am. I get dressed, have breakfast, and am then ready to begin writing at 9:00 am.

Where do you write?

Since I work on a MacPro laptop, I write in different places, depending on my mood. My usual place is my writing studio, a spare bedroom on the second floor of our home. I am greatly blessed to have this room and am so thankful for it. My desk faces the window which offers a lovely view. I also write in a spare bedroom in our home that we use as a library. Sometimes I write at the local library, and sometimes I write at a coffee shop, such as Panera’s.  Mostly, however, I write at home where it is quiet and comfortable.

What’s next for you?

Whatever God says.  I am His servant first and foremost. While I have plans for several new projects, I submit myself to God’s leading. My heart’s desire is to make His plans for me my plans for me.

That said, my plans include completing Book 3 of The Italian Chronicles. The book is almost finished and will be released in December of this year, Lord willing.  I also am in the process of compiling two books of my poetry—one for children and one for adults. I am especially excited about the poetry book for children titled Poems for Wee Ones.

In January of 2018, I plan to resume work on another novel I started a few years back titled In Black & White. I feel that the timing is now right for this story that deals with racism and its effect on the human heart.

We enjoyed your visiting us today MaryAnn. You have been such a blessing to us. I know you have been in Southern Writers Magazine a few times and we appreciate your supporting us.

Thank you again for offering me this wonderful opportunity. I deeply appreciate your kindness and generosity.

Be sure and visit MaryAnn Diorio at: http://maryanndiorio.com/

twitter.com/drmaryanndiorio

www.facebook.com/drmaryanndiorio